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What Will You Do to Create Inclusive Spaces This Year?

 

It can’t be understated: visual cues are a powerful way to show LGBTQ youth that they are welcome. It’s the first step to connecting youth experiencing homelessness with the support they need. The diversity poster featured in our True Inclusion Toolbox showcases diverse gender, sexual, racial, and ethnic identities – and it’s available for download here!

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As our co-founder Cyndi Lauper says, “We each have a personal responsibility to make sure LGBTQ youth are treated with dignity and respect.” Given our nation’s current social climate, that responsibility is growing every day. We’re at a pivotal point in our country’s history. Check out these statistics from a recent study by Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago:

  • 1 in 10 young adults ages 18-to-25 endure some form of homelessness in a year.
  • 1 in 30 adolescent minors ages 13 to 17 endure some form of homelessness in a year.
  • Black or African-American youth had an 83% higher risk for homelessness.
  • LGBT youth had a 120% higher risk for homelessness.

These numbers might be surprising to you. Youth homelessness is often referred to as “invisible” – something we all know happens, but often goes unseen. A lot of people are asking themselves, “How can I make a difference?” No matter who you are, where you live, or what you do for work or school – you can help build a culture of inclusion in your community. When young people are accepted and celebrated for who they are, they’re more likely to succeed – and youth experiencing homelessness are more likely to get the support they need.

Inclusive spaces are created with intent and consideration for all. What will you do to create a more inclusive culture for LGBTQ youth?

P.S. You can now get your own diversity posters, totes, mugs, stickers, and more! You can buy one here, or download the graphic to print your own for free! Proceeds support our work to end LGBTQ youth homelessness.

Follow Nick Seip:

Program & Communications Officer

When he’s not working at the True Colors Fund, you can find Nick somewhere in Brooklyn, listening to, making, or talking about music.